Backyard Composting Workshops July 20 and 24:   Got the Summer Time Compost Blues?  Join the Windham Solid Waste Management District for a Composting Tips Workshop Tuesday, July 20, 6-7:00 pm OR Saturday July 24, 4:30-5:30 WSWMD Transfer Station (327 Old Ferry Rd., Brattleboro) Backyard Composting Demonstration Site Summer weather can make compost heat up more rapidly, but it can also dry it out faster. Our Summer Composting Tips Workshop will include topics such as: successful composting in the hot, dry weather; how food scraps are great for bringing nutrients and moisture to compost; best ways to avoid attracting wildlife; the pros and cons of different compost bins; and, how to tell when compost is ready to use and ways to use it. The workshop is offered twice to better accommodate busy summer schedules. Bring your composting questions and see you there! Featuring a variety of compost tumblers, bins, and tools, WSWMD’s Composting Demonstration Site is open for self-guided learning. The Demo Site can also be used by garden clubs, schools, community groups, and others who want to offer compost workshops and hands-on learning opportunities. Check the District’s website (WindhamSolidWaste.org) for more information on District compost workshops and the Compost Demo Site.        

TEST TW WEATHER

Emerald Ash Borer Notice

 

 

Emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in New Hampshire. This means Vernon is now within the  “confirmed Infested Area” (a 5-mile radius from a known infested site).  

Emerald Ash Borer

EAB is an invasive insect that attacks and kills 99% all 3 species of ash found in Vermont. The larvae (the immature stage) feed on the inner bark of ash trees, disrupting the tree’s ability to transport water and nutrients. EAB has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America since it was discovered in 2002. The first EAB infestation was confirmed in Vermont in 2018 and is now widespread throughout the state.  VTInvasives.org

Planning Resources

We encourage all Vermont towns to prepare for and manage the impacts of EAB and the loss of ash trees in our communities. Dead and dying ash trees along the public right-of-way and in public places, such as parks and schools, pose a risk to public safety. The loss of ash trees will leave gaps, impacting the ecological, economic, and aesthetic benefits provided by the urban forest. Municipalities will bear the responsibility and costs of removing and/or treating public ash trees, as well as any replanting efforts. View community planning resources.